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Did you know that weeds resist climate change?

Did you know that weeds resist climate change?

One of the most common mistakes when caring for our gardens and orchards is not knowing the kind of ecosystem we face. For example, a Galician field is not the same as an Australian one.

And is that The type of vegetation, the degree of drought or the weather conditions, are fundamental aspects that we must keep in mind for the correct growth of our plants. However, if there is an issue that has been giving many headaches in recent years, it is climate change.

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But what do weeds have to do with all this? According to an international investigation led by the Higher Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), Plants that regulate their population through endogenous factors may be more resistant to the effects of climate change.

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To conclude, the study took as reference two of the most common weeds in cereal fields: the jaramago and the grass hen. Both species are invasive, and cause millionaire losses every year. The good news? By knowing in advance what species can be moved to growing areas, it is much easier to take measures to Protect the crops.

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On the other hand, and no less interesting, the farmer Peter Andrews, who has spent his entire life researching on his own how to maintain the fertility of the land, came to an amazing conclusion: weeds can also be our allies in the fight against climate change.

Based on the dry and arid climate of his native Australia, Peter devised a new farming system based on the reconduction of water flow. It is about using weeds and weeds to clog water from streams and dams, thus increasing the level of soil moisture, and finally, making plants grow more. In his own words, "it's like creating giant sponges with weeds."

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Further, weeds also act by absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, another key factor in the fight against climate change.

More information: CSIC